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President Taft's Bathtub Chronicles

Updated: Feb 15

whole naturals' castile soap for bubble bath ideas

My Dear Castile Soap Enthusiasts,

 

Last year, I was determined to find undeniable proof that President Washington used Castile Soap. While quite likely, presidential hygiene tends to stay behind closed doors, unless we’re talking about President William Howard Taft. Taft is often remembered for his significant contributions and, surprisingly, his bathtub. The tale of his custom-made oversized bathtub has become a legendary anecdote, and if you've never heard this story, I would love to take a moment to explore this historical quirk.


President Taft, known for his robust physique, faced a unique challenge – finding a bathtub that comfortably accommodated his considerable frame. In response to this predicament, a custom-made bathtub was installed (first on a USS warship) in the White House, on Taft’s presidential yacht and even inside his brother’s summer home in Texas. Measuring 7 feet long and 41 inches wide, this tub was designed to meet the president's physical needs and provide him with the luxury of relaxation.


So, did Taft ever get stuck in a bathtub?

As the “story” goes, President Taft was finishing up a bath when, due to his size, he was unable to get out of his White House bathtub – he was stuck. Great story, right? But it's not true!!


As amusing as the story of the custom tub is, it opens the door to a broader discussion about personal care and the products we use in our everyday lives. It's no secret that President Taft had a penchant for indulging in long, leisurely baths, and the choice of soap for such rituals becomes an intriguing facet of this historical tale.



The Rise of Castile Soap

Castile soap, named after the Castile region of Spain where it originated, has been a staple in skincare for centuries. Whole Naturals Castile Soap follows the same traditional soap-making recipe, using organic olive oil as its base, combined with a host of other high-quality organic carrier oils to create a gentle and nourishing cleanser that has stood the test of time. Its versatility and mild nature make it a popular choice for those seeking a natural and organic alternative to conventional soaps.


President Taft's era marked a time when indoor plumbing became increasingly available, and people began to pay more attention to personal hygiene and grooming. The choice of soap, even then, reflected an understanding of the importance of self-care.


In some ways, the process of soap making hasn’t changed much for thousands of years, but the ingredients have changed dramatically. Just as in the past, soap is made from fats and lye. They would combine fatty acids of oils (mostly animal-based), combine them with an alkali and they would form soap. Harsher soaps were used for laundry and housecleaning. This same “chemistry” is used today but with some dramatic differences. When Potassium Hydroxide (lye) is mixed with our high-quality (and organic) carrier oils, soap is formed! But no Potassium Hydroxide is left in the product after it is saponified. Another benefit, it helps to stabilize the pH of our Castile Soap. At Whole Naturals, we use modern methods to ensure that our recipe stays consistent, and we use only vegan oils (coconut, olive, hemp, and apricot kernel – just to name a few). With our nourishing carrier oils, whole Naturals offers a mild and effective cleanse, making it suitable for all skin types, including sensitive skin.


President Taft's bathtub saga not only provides a whimsical glimpse into history but also allows us to reflect on our choices when it comes to personal care. Organic Castile soap, with its rich history and timeless appeal, serves as a connection between the past and our contemporary pursuit of health and well-being. So, the next time you indulge in a luxurious bath, consider reaching for organic Castile soap – a touch of history and a splash of organic goodness for your skin.


Happy President's Week!


yohan and alex presidents whole naturals castile soap

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